Reduction of Obesity: According to the Obesity Action Coalition, in ages 2+, people get 52% of their added sugars through sugary drinks. So it stands to reason that a reduction in the consumption of these beverages will reduce obesity. And again according to the Obesity Action Coalition, a 10% increase in the price of a sugary drink will reduce its consumption by 10-12%. So a SDT will reduce obesity [1].

More evidence comes from a study done by the University of Harvard, where they show a 1% tax on each ounce of a sugary beverage reduces consumption of said beverage by 20% [2]. So it stands to reason that these taxes will reduce consumption of sugary drinks, thus reducing obesity.

And why is obesity so bad? Well, according to the CDC, obesity costs the nation nearly 150 billion in health care costs yearly. It also costs us nearly 6 billion in lost productivity each year [3]. My conclusion? SDTs will reduce obesity, which will then have a positive impact on the economy, as productivity increases and Americans have more spending money, further boosting the economy.

Increased Revenue: Philadelphia needed cash. Why? They wanted to pay for universal preschool in the city. So they passed a small, 1.5 cent tax on each ounce of a sugary drink. And the revenue generated from this tax was massive. Philly is set to make 90 million dollars from the tax. Yes, 90 million. I did some basic math, and found that each person generated 57 dollars in taxes from this tax. If we were to apply this bill nationwide, the revenue would be over 20 billion dollars. Think of all the amazing things the government could fund with this tax. I just read this recently: Oklahoma, in facing a gigantic deficit due to the state’s foolish management of funds and tax policy, has had to cut the school funding, meaning the kids only go to school for 4 days in a week. This tax would stop that. [4]

Also, in Berkeley, California, a city you mentioned, implemented a 1 cent per ounce tax on sugary beverages. The tax was an enormous success, with consumption of sugary beverages plummeting. Even better, grocery stores, corner stores, and the like didn’t lose revenue from the tax. Why? Consumers just switched to buying healthier beverages like milk, water, and natural fruit drinks. [5]

So that’s my argument. I know it is short, but I only really had two points.

Sources:

1: http://www.obesityaction.org…
2: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu…
3: https://www.cdc.gov…
4: https://billypenn.com…
5: http://www.berkeleyside.com…



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